Brain Injury Awareness South Eastern Area

I find it hard to remember and I find it a little hard to write.

Cedar helped me find a class to do Art and English and I enjoy it because it helps me learn.

Anonymous

 

I can't drive, therefore I can't make friends as easily. I'm strong minded and I'm willing to give anything a go. I have a weakness down my left hand side as a result of my motor vehicle accident. To sit and concentrate on something would be hard to do, but my attention span has definitely increased.

Cedar have given me the opportunity of going to tech and doing CLAIT and also supported me through my NVQ Level 2 in Business Administration. Cedar has also given me the opportunity to gain work experience in different working environments.

Craig Ferguson

 

My life has been turned upside down. It has affected my walking. It has ruined my life.

The Cedar Foundation has got me a job and got me back into the community and they have helped me with English and Maths.

D

 

Katrina's Story....

KatrinaMy name is Katrina and I am 23 and this is my personal experience of entering planet cancer.

I was a kid without any problems when I was growing up. I used to go to Irish dancing and was a member of the Briginis.

When I was eleven I was diagnosed with a Brain Tumour. Living with a brain injury is very tough on you and your family. It is quite difficult when you have a disability that is noticeable...

Follow the link to read more...

 

A Brain Injury does not have obvious physical distinctions. People sometimes assume that nothing has happened and you are taking advantage of it.

It is different for each of us and can be lonely.

It can be embarrassing to use the phrase "Brain Injury"

The main difference is that I have met other people who have experienced something similar and can identify with each other.

I do not feel as guilty and self-conscious as I once did of not working full-time.

I appreciate the support I have received from The Cedar Foundation.

Ita Murray

 

ArtworkOne of the challenges of living with Brain Injury is accepting the change. I know I have changed my outlook on life - I don't have as high expectations of myself.

The Cedar Foundation has made a difference - I have joined a book club with Cedar and I enjoy the reading.

Anonymous

 

My name is Ben Sheriff and I started using Cedar's support to help establish myself in work and help me live with my brain injury. My brain injury affects me day to day, in different ways, ranging from forgetting something, to even remembering what I'm doing on a basic level. This can cause me great stress as I forget even the easiest things. But thanks to Cedar's support through the past year, I've greatly overcome some of the challenges I was experiencing at work. Thanks to regular contact with Cedar I can remember what I'm doing. But I still need the support. If it was gone, I'd be at a loss again.

My brain injury can also cause me to trance out when I'm overcome with too much information. On some days I feel I can do any task. On others I feel lost, confused and sort of out of place. This has also caused me stress, but, once again, Cedar helped me by sorting me a work placement and introducing me to a charity organisation that deals with a wide range of people everyday. This I am grateful for as I've now been getting on with work without the stress and overpowering space outs I was having. Regular checkups help me to ensure that I don't miss something out.

Ben

 

Sylvia GawleyOne of the challenges of living with Brain Injury is accepting that you have changed. How others perceive you. How friends become acquaintances. Learning to do things all over again e.g. Driving, shopping.

The Cedar Foundation has made a difference in helping me accept my disability. Meeting others in the same boat. The tutors have time for you. I never feel inadequate. I look forward to the Cedar groups.

Sylvia Gawley

 

I find it hard to remember and I find it a little hard to write.

Cedar helped me find a class to do Art and English and I enjoy it because it helps me learn.

Anonymous

 

Living with a brain injury means two things - good and bad changes in your life. One is that you're always thought of at home with family and friends and someone is always there for you. The bad things are your life is turned upside down and you don't know what is going to happen to you in the future.

Cedar has helped me get back my life with my family and friends and I have made new friends and I have gained new ground, like how to operate a computer. Also they have helped me get qualifications and get me back on my feet with the world around me.

By Les

 

ArtworkOne of the challenges of living with Brain Injury is that I don't like going places where there are crowds because noise affects me. I can't have too much noise. It was hard for me going out shopping at first but then I got around it.

Cedar has helped me realise that I'm not on my own. It has given me the opportunity to meet new people and, as well as the training I have received, I also have the opportunity to be part of a social group which goes out once a month.

Anonymous

 

Only speaking personally, but my brain injury affected my confidence both physically and mentally. I feel as if I can't show my true personality because of my speech and physically because of my arm.

The Cedar Foundation has given me an outlet. I'm friends with people I would never have met. It's given me the confidence to meet new people and also it gets you out of the house.

Anonymous